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Foreign exchange in 2018: David Puth speaks to FX Week

Technology and regulatory guidance and principles will shape the foreign exchange (FX) market’s structure in 2018, according to David Puth, CEO of CLS, in an exclusive interview with FX Week.

2017 saw the publication of the FX Global Code, and a number of leading financial services and technology institutions confirmed their commitment to adopting and instilling its principles. This trend, Puth says, will continue in 2018 as the Global Foreign Exchange Committee publishes its final guidance on Principal 17 covering “last look”.

2018 will also be a year in which CLS expands its role offering new solutions to improve efficiency and reduce risk in the FX market.

“We are becoming more than a settlement utility. While delivering the risk mitigation that comes with safe settlement is our primary mission, we continue to focus on delivering products that solve client problems,” says Puth.

These include a same-day settlement service for five of the world’s most liquid currencies, and its much-anticipated distributed ledger technology (DLT) enabled netting service, CLSNet.

These technologies will likely have a significant impact on FX market structure, helping it to become more efficient and speed up the movement of currency around the world.

For more on what 2018 holds for FX, including David’s thoughts on the dollar and bitcoin, read the full interview here.

ECB publicly endorses FX Global Code

The European Central Bank (ECB) has become the latest central bank to endorse the Bank of International Settlements’ (BIS) FX Global Code, joining others including the New York Federal Reserve and the Reserve Bank of Australia. This signals that currency-trading institutions who do not sign up may well find their counterparties limited in future.

Whilst the ECB did not issue a legal mandate for its currency market counterparties to sign up to the Code, market participants have been invited to publicly declare commitment to the Code by May 2018, one year on from its publication. It is clear that the central banks are taking the Code very seriously, and rightly so.

The Code sets out a comprehensive set of best practice guidelines which outline how all market participants, regardless of institution type, should behave in order to uphold the highest standards of transparency and ethics in the wholesale FX market.

Since the final version of the Code was published two months ago, many institutions have already committed to adopting it. Those that haven’t will likely be spurred into action by the ECB’s firm encouragement.

This advocacy for an important set of principles is to be welcomed.

Chatsworth supports global push to restore trust to the world’s largest financial market

 

Foreign Exchange is the world’s largest and most liquid market and it has taken a repetitional battering over recent years.

Now the final part of the Bank of International Settlements’ (BIS) FX Global Code has been published, following a two-year, industry-wide effort to rebuild trust in the FX market following a series of scandals and market challenges over the past decade.

The Code sets out a comprehensive set of best practice guidelines which outline how all market participants should behave to uphold the highest standards of transparency and ethics in the wholesale FX market.

Chatsworth is proud to have played our part through our work with CLS and its CEO David Puth – Chairman of the BIS’s Market Participants Group and one of the principal authors of the code. This included an extensive engagement campaign to educate the press and FX market on the Code’s aims and objectives.

More than 1,500 people have had input to the Code and have helped to shape a set of high-level principles that will impact their day-to-day business practices.

The final document has received widespread support across the FX industry. A number of industry participants – banks, platform providers, technology vendors and trade associations – have backed it.

Now it is the time for the FX industry to adopt the Code’s principles and all FX professionals to read, understand and apply it to their everyday trading and transactional activity.

David Puth speaks to Bloomberg TV about the Code

 

Adherence to FX Global Code will reform conduct and behaviour

As we near the final stages of the development of the foreign exchange (FX) Global Code, the ACI Financial Markets Association (ACIFMA) is leading efforts to support education and adherence. We will start by making commitment to the Code mandatory for ACIFMA members, and encourage members to prove their adherence in future. This could prove to be a turning point in reforming conduct and behaviour in foreign exchange, writes Brigid Taylor in FX Week.

As a member of the MPG, ACIFMA has both contributed and witnessed the extent to which market participants and policymakers have engaged, discussed, debated and worked together in the best interests of the wider market. This is an industry that transacts more than USD5 trillion of currencies across borders every single day. Its ability to operate smoothly is crucial to the international economy.

There was of course a broad range of views on how best to address a series of topics, such as governance, information sharing, last look and pre-hedging. An array of views is expected in any large consultation, but consensus has been achieved with the best interests of the market in mind.

The final Code will, in my view, outline principles and guidance that is effective, appropriate and strike the right balance. I expect it to act as an essential reference for market participants when conducting business in the wholesale FX markets and when developing and reviewing internal procedures.

Hardwiring adherence – the third objective

This brings us to the final objective set out at the beginning of the process: develop proposals to promote and incentivise adherence to the Code.

For this to happen, it is essential that individuals (i) commit to adhering to the Code; (ii) receive the appropriate training and education so they are clear on what is expected and understand how to comply; and (iii) sign up to a solution where senior managers are able to observe and address any training and educational gaps amongst their subordinates.

This is where the ACI Financial Markets Association (ACIFMA) can play a central role. With a track record in delivering training, education, attestation and best practice principles that stretches back more than half a century, we represent more than 9000 individuals in 60+ countries.

There are several ways we intend to achieve this. Firstly, we will make it a prerequisite for individuals to commit to adhering to the FX Global Code as part of their membership. This means a meaningful proportion of the market – over 9,000 FX professionals around the world – will sign up immediately after the code is launched and commit to understanding, implementing and abiding by the new principles.

There is an urgent need to restore ethics in financial markets and the FX market is aware of its responsibilities to its clients and stakeholders. The significance of the enormous effort undertaken over the past three years should not be underestimated; to date, the level of leadership and engagement has been exemplary. I expect the FX Global Code to be a turning point in reforming conduct and behaviour in foreign exchange and develop a renewed sense of trust in this important sector of any economy.

To read the full article by Brigid, please visit the FX Week website here.