Carillion collapse shines spotlight on late payments issue

The collapse of construction giant Carillion has focused media and government attention on the global issue of payment terms after it was discovered the group paid subcontractors with a 120-day delay. These delayed payments meant many suppliers had to resort to expensive bank finance to stay in business while others are now facing bankruptcy.

Recognising the importance of ending the culture of late payment, two FTSE 100 chairmen have joined the advisory board of Previse, a UK based company which uses artificial intelligence to solve slow payments for the entire supply chain.

Chairman of supermarket chain J Sainsbury, David Tyler and chairman of property group British Land, John Gildersleeve have joined the company as investors and advisers.

Previse’s AI technology is designed to enable large firms to pay suppliers on the day they receive an invoice. The London-based firm’s technology calculates a buyer’s likelihood of paying an invoice, before deciding which invoices will be paid, so small suppliers can be paid instantly.

David Tyler said: “The length of time it can take for suppliers to be paid hurts not only them, but the large companies buying their products and services as well.” He believes that Previse will bring benefits to the entire supply chain and that the company has a bright future ahead of it.

Mr Gildersleeve, who is also deputy chairman of telecoms company TalkTalk, told the Financial Times that Previse could tackle an issue that has, “infected British business forever.”

Lengthy payment terms and the prevalence of slow payments by large buyers, which affects three in five SME suppliers, cause 50,000 UK SMEs to close each year. Previse’s artificial intelligence technology allows even very small suppliers to receive payment the day they issue their invoice by instantly identifying if an invoice is correct and allowing a funder to pay the supplier immediately based on this information.

“I am proud to be able to welcome our new board members who represent incredible senior experience across such a wide range of industries with significant supply chains.” Said Paul Christensen, CEO of Previse. “I think this shows the deep understanding across industry that slow payments are a real problem, and confidence in our approach to tackling the problem.”


J.P. Morgan deploys Mosaic Smart Data for fixed income data analytics

As a recent piece in the FT pointed out, traders are searching for ever more inventive data streams to try to make better predictions about their market or get an edge over the competition. Whether that be advanced social media analytics, algorithms to read the news or even using drones and satellite images to look at factories, banks, and hedge funds are investing significant amounts in collecting and analysing data.

But, banks know that there is a vast wealth of data created and stored within the institution created simply through the normal course of the trading day. This is free, and it is completely proprietary.

The problem is, data within the bank is distributed across desks, systems and messaging languages. Bringing that all into one, aggregated and standardised form so that the algorithms can work their magic and deliver valuable insights is a herculean task.

But that is exactly what Mosaic Smart Data has announced it is doing J.P. Morgan.

By using sophisticated historical, real-time and predictive analytics algorithms, the Mosaic’s platform will provide, in the first instance, J.P. Morgan’s rates, sales and trading business with advanced tools to accurately provide tailored client service. This innovative technology enables users to better visualise and anticipate market and client activity and thereby offer better service. It can also reduce the cost and complexity of compliance.

“Having a more holistic view of trading data will improve our service delivery for clients.” Said Troy Rohrbaugh, Global Head of Macro at J.P. Morgan. “The Mosaic platform integrates securely with our existing technology infrastructure, and enables our teams to quickly make better-informed decisions.”

Once these fundamentals of a data analytics platform are in place. Mosaic can roll out advanced machine learning and predictive analytics which will help sales teams to predict their clients’ behaviour, allowing them to better facilitate client needs and improve their performance.

“Data analytics and artificial intelligence are changing the face of investment banking.” Says Matthew Hodgson, CEO, and founder of Mosaic Smart Data. “Banks understand that the insights locked away in their transaction and market data are potentially some of their biggest competitive advantages. They already have the raw materials, but MSX® gives them the tools to aggregate and standardise that data and put it to work intelligently.”

We Explore or We Expire: SxSW Tech Briefing

“We explore, or we expire,” said astronaut Buzz Aldrin, of the Apollo 11 mission and one of the first two humans to land on the moon.

This simple sentence won over SXSW this year, the event in Austin, Texas which brings together some of the brightest minds in technology and innovation to collaborate.

In his keynote speech, Aldrin was talking about the push to Mars, but his speech and sentiment went wider – exploring how people and organisations are thinking and learning new ways to communicate, adapt, survive and flourish.

Virtual reality (VR) was everywhere, but there is still real debate about its real world application. In our view, VR is still looking like fun toys to promote films and event experiences. Smells a little like 3D TVs to us, and we know how that fad ended.

Does anyone really want to wear those headsets?

AI, however, is another matter. This was hot for the second year running and is being positioned as the next big disruptor.

Harley Davidson, for example, is using an AI tool to match audiences to its current database – finding customers who might be interested in purchasing a motorbike through machine learning. It attributes 40% of its sales in New York to this tool.

Disney’s R&D studio is using AI as a tool for storytelling across multiple digital platforms.

One speaker estimated that a 30-year grace period before AI completely takes over the workplace, calling for a push to design AI to augment rather than replace people.

This requires a clear distinction between AI (artificial intelligence) and IA, or intelligent augmentation.

AI is about reproducing human cognition and functioning autonomously, while IA is about supplementing and supporting it, leaving the intentionality of human operators at the heart of the process.

For brands, this is going to continue to be about making sense of complex data through machine learning, enhance and augment, rather than merely removing human roles.

Back to Mr Aldrin’s alma mater, NASA, which is working with Google to explore the application of quantum computing to artificial intelligence.

The space agency’s Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) is using quantum computers to perform calculations that are difficult or impossible using conventional supercomputers, effectively becoming a quasi-AI.

The team aims to demonstrate that quantum computing and quantum algorithms may someday dramatically improve the agency’s ability to solve difficult problems for space missions but also back on earth.